Single Origin Filter

6 products

    6 products
    Colombia Gaitania Single Origin Filter 200g
    Colombia Gaitania Single Origin Filter 200g
    Colombia Gaitania Single Origin Filter 200g
    $16.90
    Sidamo Nansebo Single Origin 200g
    Sidamo Nansebo Single Origin 200g
    Sidamo Nansebo Single Origin 200g
    from $15.90
    Ethiopia Tarekegn Gutu Single Origin Filter 200g
    Ethiopia Tarekegn Gutu Single Origin Filter 200g
    Ethiopia Tarekegn Gutu Single Origin Filter 200g
    $16.90
    Kenya Kiruru AA Single Origin Filter 200g
    Kenya Kiruru AA Single Origin Filter 200g
    Kenya Kiruru AA Single Origin Filter 200g
    $16.90
    Yirgacheffe Hafursa Single Origin 200g
    from $15.90
    Burundi Mageyo SC15+ Single Origin 200g
    Burundi Mageyo SC15+ Single Origin 200g
    Burundi Mageyo SC15+ Single Origin 200g
    from $15.90

    How many times have you been in a coffee shop, looked at the coffee on sale, and wondered what the fuss of single origin filter coffee was about? What does that mean? Why does it matter? Is it worth it?

    The label is essential, even if you're not the only one who feels like that. Read on as Perfect Daily Grind decodes coffee labels and café menus from all across the world in this informative article. During this session, you will learn about the importance of this topic and the factors that have propelled it into the limelight. You will also learn a few suggestions on how you may confidently use what you've learned.

     

    Is there any significance to the terms "single origin", "single estate", and "single farm"?

    Small yet powerful, the term "single origin" has a lot of meaning. Coffee that comes from one single producer, crop, or location in one country is the most common way to describe it. Only one farm, mill or co-op produces the coffee. There are coffee labels that will tell you the estate name, the particular lot or paddock the coffee was produced on, as well as if it's a microlot (a small batch) (a specific varietal from a specific farm).

    As a result, single-origin coffees have a high level of traceability, which means you know precisely where your coffee comes from and that it isn't a blend. In addition to its better quality, it signifies that the coffee comes from a certain farm in a distinct location, and that its flavour is representative of the region where it was cultivated.

     

    The Growing Trend of Single Origin Coffee

    As a result, how did single roots become part of the "mainstream" language? It turns out, according to Jeremy Torz, co-founder and managing director of Union Hand-Roasted Coffee, the current interest in them has been inspired by an increase in the number of speciality cafés providing other brewing methods, including as pour-over and AeroPress brews. Since it is possible to serve other types of coffee without compromising the essence of espresso, they have moved into the realm of espresso," he explains. Many baristas are willing to violate convention in order to redefine the coffee experience because of the quick speed of our profession and the drive to continuously experiment and innovate among baristas."

    Due to their traceability, single sources appear to be particularly attractive. "Educated customers," says Andrew Hetzel of CafeMakers Coffee Consultants, "want help comprehending and articulating the complex flavours and feelings that they experience from exceptional coffees. " Despite the fact that the majority of consumers are uneducated and have no desire to become informed, they may be discreetly steered towards higher-quality coffee products. A roaster's or retailer's supporting information, which describes the coffee's origins (the farm's location and the people who work there), climate, varietal, processing, and so on, is highly beneficial."

    Recently viewed